The rewards of royal service in the household of King John: A dissenting opinion

@article{Church1995TheRO,
  title={The rewards of royal service in the household of King John: A dissenting opinion},
  author={Stephen B. Church},
  journal={The English Historical Review},
  year={1995},
  volume={110},
  pages={277-302}
}
  • S. Church
  • Published 1 March 1995
  • History
  • The English Historical Review
8 Citations
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