The revolutionary developmental biology of Wilhelm His, Sr.

@article{Richardson2022TheRD,
  title={The revolutionary developmental biology of Wilhelm His, Sr.},
  author={Michael K. Richardson and Gerhard Keuck},
  journal={Biological Reviews},
  year={2022},
  volume={97}
}
Swiss‐born embryologist Wilhelm His, Sr. (1831–1904) was the first scientist to study embryos using paraffin histology, serial sectioning and three‐dimensional modelling. With these techniques, His made many important discoveries in vertebrate embryology and developmental neurobiology, earning him two Nobel Prize nominations. He also developed several theories of mechanical and evolutionary developmental biology. His argued that adult form is determined by the differential growth of… 
2 Citations
Theories, laws, and models in evo-devo.
  • M. Richardson
  • Biology
    Journal of experimental zoology. Part B, Molecular and developmental evolution
  • 2021
TLDR
It is argued that the "body plan" is an archetype, and is often used in such a way that it lacks any scientific meaning, and one challenge for evo-devo will be to develop new theories and models to accommodate the wealth of new data from high-throughput sequencing, as in the "transcriptomic hourglass" models.

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