The revision of the Declaration of Helsinki: past, present and future.

@article{Carlson2004TheRO,
  title={The revision of the Declaration of Helsinki: past, present and future.},
  author={Robert V. Carlson and Kenneth M. Boyd and David John Webb},
  journal={British journal of clinical pharmacology},
  year={2004},
  volume={57 6},
  pages={
          695-713
        }
}
The World Medical Association's Declaration of Helsinki was first adopted in 1964. In its 40-year lifetime the Declaration has been revised five times and has risen to a position of prominence as a guiding statement of ethical principles for doctors involved in medical research. The most recent revision, however, has resulted in considerable controversy, particularly in the area of the ethical requirements surrounding placebo-controlled trials and the question of responsibilities to research… Expand
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