The response of skin disease to stress: changes in the severity of acne vulgaris as affected by examination stress.

@article{Chiu2003TheRO,
  title={The response of skin disease to stress: changes in the severity of acne vulgaris as affected by examination stress.},
  author={Annie E Chiu and Susan Y. Chon and Alexa B Kimball},
  journal={Archives of dermatology},
  year={2003},
  volume={139 7},
  pages={
          897-900
        }
}
BACKGROUND Although emotional stress has long been suspected to exacerbate acne vulgaris, previous reports addressing its influence on acne severity have been mainly anecdotal. [] Key MethodDESIGN Prospective cohort study. SETTING General university community. PARTICIPANTS A volunteer sample of 22 university students (15 women and 7 men) with a minimum acne vulgaris severity of 0.5 on the photonumeric Leeds acne scale (baseline scores, 0.50-1.75).

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