The research impact of broadcast programming reconsidered: Academic involvement in programme-making

@article{Williams2019TheRI,
  title={The research impact of broadcast programming reconsidered: Academic involvement in programme-making},
  author={Se{\'a}n M. Williams},
  journal={Research for All},
  year={2019}
}
This commentary responds to an article by Melissa Grant, Lucy Vernall and Kirsty Hill in Research for All (Grant et al. , 2018) that assessed the impact of broadcast programming through quantitative and qualitative evidence. In that piece, the authors attended exclusively to the uptake by, and attitudes of, end users. But viewer or social media statistics can paint a patchy picture, and feedback groups recreate an unusually attentive mode of reception. This commentary argues for an alternative… 

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