The representation of colours in the cerebral cortex

@article{Zeki1980TheRO,
  title={The representation of colours in the cerebral cortex},
  author={Semir Zeki},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1980},
  volume={284},
  pages={412-418}
}
  • S. Zeki
  • Published 3 April 1980
  • Biology
  • Nature
New insights into how colour is represented in the cerebral cortex and what variables govern the responses of single cortical colour-coded cells have been gained by the discovery of specific visual cortical areas rich in colour-coded cells. 
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rather than being in opposition, the analytic and holistic approaches to perception complement each other. Veridical object recognition depends not only on the perception of features, but also on
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