The relationships among Black consciousness, self-esteem, and academic self-efficacy in African American men.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships among Black consciousness, self-esteem, and academic self-efficacy in African American men. The participants were 120 African American male college students at a predominantly African American university. The authors administered 3 instruments--the Developmental Inventory of Black Consciousness (DIB-C; J. Milliones, 1980), the M. Rosenberg (1965) Self-Esteem Scale, and R. E. Wood and E. A. Locke's (1987) Academic Self-Efficacy Scale--to test the hypotheses. They used an independent-measures t test and a Pearson r correlation to analyze the data. The results of the study supported the hypotheses under investigation. Significant positive relationships were found between Black consciousness and self-esteem and Black consciousness and academic self-efficacy. The results of the study showed that Black consciousness appears to be an important construct to use in understanding self-esteem and academic self-efficacy in African American men.

Cite this paper

@article{Okech2002TheRA, title={The relationships among Black consciousness, self-esteem, and academic self-efficacy in African American men.}, author={Allan Prince Okech and Rick Harrington}, journal={The Journal of psychology}, year={2002}, volume={136 2}, pages={214-24} }