The relationship of in vivo central CB1 receptor occupancy to changes in cortical monoamine release and feeding elicited by CB1 receptor antagonists in rats

@article{Need2005TheRO,
  title={The relationship of in vivo central CB1 receptor occupancy to changes in cortical monoamine release and feeding elicited by CB1 receptor antagonists in rats},
  author={Anne B. Need and Richard Jon Davis and Jesline T. Alexander-Chacko and Brian Eastwood and Eyassu Chernet and Lee Phebus and Dana K. Sindelar and G. Nomikos},
  journal={Psychopharmacology},
  year={2005},
  volume={184},
  pages={26-35}
}
RationaleCannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor antagonists are reportedly effective in reducing food intake both preclinically and clinically. This may be due in part to their effects on monoamine release in the brain. The level of central CB1 receptor occupancy underlying these neurobiological effects is unclear.ObjectivesWe explored the relationship between in vivo CB1 receptor occupancy in the frontal cortex and changes in both monoamine release in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and feeding… 
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