The relationship between trauma and beliefs about hearing voices: a study of psychiatric and non-psychiatric voice hearers

@article{Andrew2008TheRB,
  title={The relationship between trauma and beliefs about hearing voices: a study of psychiatric and non-psychiatric voice hearers},
  author={Elizabeth Andrew and Nicola Susan Gray and Robert J. Snowden},
  journal={Psychological Medicine},
  year={2008},
  volume={38},
  pages={1409 - 1417}
}
Background Cognitive models suggest that distress associated with auditory hallucinations is best understood in terms of beliefs about voices. What is less clear is what factors govern such beliefs. This study aimed to explore the way in which traumatic life events contribute towards beliefs about voices and any associated distress. Method The difference in the nature and prevalence of traumatic life events and associated psychological sequelae was compared in two groups of voice hearers… Expand
Beliefs about Voices and Schemas about Self and Others in Psychosis
TLDR
Schemas, particularly those regarding the self, are potentially important in the formation of a range of clinically-relevant beliefs about voices. Expand
Reviewing evidence for the cognitive model of auditory hallucinations: The relationship between cognitive voice appraisals and distress during psychosis.
TLDR
Several types of appraisals were found to be linked to higher levels of distress in voice hearers, including voices appraisal as malevolent, voices appraised as high in supremacy, Voices appraised to have personal acquaintance with the individual, and attitudes of disapproval and rejection towards voices. Expand
The relationship between metacognitive beliefs, auditory hallucinations, and hallucination-related distress in clinical and non-clinical voice-hearers.
TLDR
Regression analyses revealed that the negative beliefs about need for control subscale of the MCQ-30 was the only significant predictor of voice-related distress, although this effect was no longer significant after controlling for the effect of group. Expand
Does religious belief enable positive interpretation of auditory hallucinations? A comparison of religious voice hearers with and without psychosis
TLDR
Religious belief appeared to have a profound, beneficial influence on the mentally healthy Christians’ interpretation of hearing voices, but had little or no influence in the case of Christian patients. Expand
An ecological examination of proximal psychological mechanisms related to the experience of and therapy for distressing voices
Voice hearing (or auditory verbal hallucinations) is a commonly reported experience across a range of psychiatric diagnoses, and is often associated with high levels of distress and disruption toExpand
Varieties of Voice-Hearing: Psychics and the Psychosis Continuum
TLDR
A new study population: clairaudient psychics who receive daily auditory messages is introduced and it is found that this sample of non-help-seeking voice hearers were able to control the onset and offset of their voices, that they were less distressed by their voice-hearing experiences and that, the first time they admitted to voice- hearing, the reception by others was much more likely to be positive. Expand
Echoes of others: A path analytic examination of an interpersonal–cognitive model of voice‐related distress
TLDR
Support is added to the suggestion that voice-related distress occurs in the context of an insecure attachment style and negative core beliefs about self and others, as well as to the proposal that attachment anxiety/avoidance drive negative beliefs aboutSelf and others. Expand
Voice hearing in a biographical context: A model for formulating the relationship between voices and life history
Growing evidence suggests a meaningful association between life experience, particularly trauma and loss, and subsequent psychotic symptomatology. This paper describes a method of psychologicalExpand
Hallucinatory Experiences in Non-clinical Populations
It is now widely recognised that some people hear voices in the absence of distress or a need for psychiatric care. Although there have been reports of such individuals throughout history, untilExpand
Relationship between neuroticism, childhood trauma and cognitive-affective responses to auditory verbal hallucinations
TLDR
In both clinical and non-clinical voice-hearers alike, a higher level of neuroticism was associated with more distress and behavioral resistance in response to AVHs, as well as a stronger tendency to perceive voices as malevolent and powerful. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 51 REFERENCES
Cognitive assessment of voices: further developments in understanding the emotional impact of voices.
  • H. Close, P. Garety
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • The British journal of clinical psychology
  • 1998
TLDR
Compared to the previous study, current participants were significantly less likely to believe in the omnipotence of their voices, to view their voices as omniscient and to have a positive affective response to benevolent voices. Expand
Auditory hallucinations: a comparison between patients and nonpatients.
TLDR
The form and the content of chronic auditory hallucinations were compared in three cohorts, namely patients with schizophrenia, patients with a dissociative disorder, and nonpatient voice-hearers to present evidence that the form of the hallucinations experienced by both patient and non patient groups is similar, irrespective of diagnosis. Expand
The omnipotence of voices. A cognitive approach to auditory hallucinations.
TLDR
It is shown that highly disparate relationships with voices-fear, reassurance, engagement and resistance-reflect vital differences in beliefs about the voices, and how these core beliefs about voices may become a new target for treatment. Expand
The power and omnipotence of voices: subordination and entrapment by voices and significant others
TLDR
This study suggests that the power imbalance between the individual and his persecutor(s) may have origins in an appraisal by the individual of his social rank and sense of group identification and belonging. Expand
Asking about abuse during mental health assessments: clients' views and experiences
This study reports the perceptions of 74 members of mental health consumer groups in New Zealand regarding their first assessment. Two-thirds of the participants reported sexual, physical orExpand
The revised Beliefs About Voices Questionnaire (BAVQ-R).
TLDR
The revised Beliefs About Voices Questionnaire (BAVQ-R) is more reliable and sensitive to individual differences than the original version, and reliably measures omnipotence. Expand
Sexual and physical abuse during childhood and adulthood as predictors of hallucinations, delusions and thought disorder.
TLDR
Investigation of the hypotheses that childhood sexual and physical abuse are related to hallucinations, delusions, and thought disorder in adults and that those relationships are greater in those who have suffered abuse during adulthood as well as childhood found that child abuse was a significant predictor of auditory and tactile hallucinations, even in the absence of adult abuse. Expand
The illusion of reality: a review and integration of psychological research on hallucinations.
  • R. Bentall
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Psychological bulletin
  • 1990
TLDR
The available evidence suggests that hallucinations result from a failure of the metacognitive skills involved in discriminating between self-generated and external sources of information, and that different aspects of these skills are implicated in different types of hallucinations. Expand
Trauma exposure and posttraumatic stress disorder in psychosis: findings from a first-admission cohort.
This study examined the lifetime prevalence of trauma exposure and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and their demographic, diagnostic, and trauma-related correlates in a clinical cohort of 426Expand
THE INTERPRETATION OF INTRUSIONS IN PSYCHOSIS: AN INTEGRATIVE COGNITIVE APPROACH TO HALLUCINATIONS AND DELUSIONS
  • A. Morrison
  • Psychology
  • Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy
  • 2001
A cognitive approach to the understanding of psychotic symptoms that focuses on the interpretation of intrusions into awareness is outlined. It is argued that many positive psychotic symptoms (suchExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...