The relationship between the belief in a genetic cause for breast cancer and bilateral mastectomy.

@article{Petrie2015TheRB,
  title={The relationship between the belief in a genetic cause for breast cancer and bilateral mastectomy.},
  author={Keith J. Petrie and Solbj{\o}rg Makalani Myrtveit and Ann H. Partridge and Melika H Stephens and Annette L. Stanton},
  journal={Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association},
  year={2015},
  volume={34 5},
  pages={
          473-6
        }
}
  • K. PetrieS. M. Myrtveit A. Stanton
  • Published 1 May 2015
  • Medicine
  • Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association
OBJECTIVE Most women develop causal beliefs following diagnosis with breast cancer and these beliefs can guide decisions around their care and management. Bilateral mastectomy rates are increasing, although the benefits of this surgery are only established in a small percentage of women. In this study we investigated the relationship between causal beliefs and the decision to have a bilateral mastectomy. METHOD Women (N = 2,269) from the Army of Women's breast cancer research registry… 

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