The relationship between anxiety and problem-solving skills in children with and without learning disabilities.

Abstract

This study compared the effects of low, medium, and high pretest anxiety levels on the social and nonsocial problem-solving performance of 45 boys with learning disabilities (LD) and 45 boys with no learning disabilities (NLD). Participants ranged from 9 to 11 years of age. Boys with LD reported significantly higher pretest trait and state anxiety on the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children than did NLD boys, and their perceived state anxiety escalated over the course of the problem-solving session. There were no pervasive effects of LD status on problem solving by itself, boys with LD being as effective in problem solving as NLD boys. However, means for task solution suggest a tendency for an interaction between group and anxiety level, which should be examined using a larger, well-defined sample and an unstructured task.

Cite this paper

@article{Fisher1996TheRB, title={The relationship between anxiety and problem-solving skills in children with and without learning disabilities.}, author={B L Fisher and Roy L. Allen and Gary Kose}, journal={Journal of learning disabilities}, year={1996}, volume={29 4}, pages={439-46} }