The relationship between adolescents' academic stress, impulsivity, anxiety, and skin picking behavior.

Abstract

BACKGROUND Skin picking behavior involves an individual picking or biting their skin repeatedly. Although this behavior commonly occurs at a young age, little research has addressed its harmful effects among the Korean population. Therefore, we examined the characteristics of South Korean adolescents who reported skin picking behavior. METHOD South Korean students aged 12-16 years participated (N=410, females=52.2%). They completed questionnaires that addressed skin picking behavior, academic stress, impulsivity, and anxiety. The survey was conducted in Seoul and Gyeonggi-do from February-March 2016. RESULTS Among participants, 66.8% reported that they had picked their skin and 15.4% did so currently. Skin picking was positively correlated with academic stress, impulsivity, and anxiety. Students who picked their skin more often displayed more anxiety, academic stress, and impulsivity. CONCLUSIONS Future studies should address skin picking adolescents' characteristics, especially regarding anxiety and academic stress. Educational programs should be implemented to help adolescents decrease their anxiety and academic stress and prevent the worsening of skin picking behavior.

DOI: 10.1016/j.ajp.2017.03.039

Cite this paper

@article{Yeo2017TheRB, title={The relationship between adolescents' academic stress, impulsivity, anxiety, and skin picking behavior.}, author={Sun Kyung Yeo and Woo Kyeong Lee}, journal={Asian journal of psychiatry}, year={2017}, volume={28}, pages={111-114} }