The reign of typicality in semantic memory

@article{Patterson2007TheRO,
  title={The reign of typicality in semantic memory},
  author={Karalyn E Patterson},
  journal={Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences},
  year={2007},
  volume={362},
  pages={813 - 821}
}
  • K. Patterson
  • Published 29 May 2007
  • Psychology
  • Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
This paper begins with a brief description of a theoretical framework for semantic memory, in which processing is inherently sensitive to the varying typicality of its representations. The approach is then elaborated with particular regard to evidence from semantic dementia, a disorder resulting in relatively selective deterioration of conceptual knowledge, in which cognitive performance reveals ubiquitous effects of typicality. This applies to frankly semantic tasks (like object naming), where… 

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