Corpus ID: 33943268

The recycling pathway of protein ERGIC-53 and dynamics of the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment.

@article{Klumperman1998TheRP,
  title={The recycling pathway of protein ERGIC-53 and dynamics of the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment.},
  author={Judith Klumperman and Anja Schweizer and Henrik Clausen and Bor Luen Tang and Wanjin Hong and Viola Oorschot and H. P. Hauri},
  journal={Journal of cell science},
  year={1998},
  volume={111 ( Pt 22)},
  pages={
          3411-25
        }
}
To establish recycling routes in the early secretory pathway we have studied the recycling of the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC) marker ERGIC-53 in HepG2 cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed progressive concentration of ERGIC-53 in the Golgi area at 15 degreesC. Upon rewarming to 37 degreesC ERGIC-53 redistributed into the cell periphery often via tubular processes that largely excluded anterograde transported albumin. Immunogold labeling of cells cultured at 37 degreesC… Expand
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References

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