The rapid formation of Sputnik Planitia early in Pluto’s history

@article{Hamilton2016TheRF,
  title={The rapid formation of Sputnik Planitia early in Pluto’s history},
  author={Douglas P. Hamilton and S. Alan Stern and J. M. Moore and Leslie A. Young},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2016},
  volume={540},
  pages={97-99}
}
Pluto’s Sputnik Planitia is a bright, roughly circular feature that resembles a polar ice cap. It is approximately 1,000 kilometres across and is centred on a latitude of 25 degrees north and a longitude of 175 degrees, almost directly opposite the side of Pluto that always faces Charon as a result of tidal locking. One explanation for its location includes the formation of a basin in a giant impact, with subsequent upwelling of a dense interior ocean. Once the basin was established, ice would… 

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