The quality of the evidence for dietary advice given in UK national newspapers

@article{Cooper2012TheQO,
  title={The quality of the evidence for dietary advice given in UK national newspapers},
  author={Benjamin E J Cooper and William E Lee and Ben Goldacre and Thomas A B Sanders},
  journal={Public Understanding of Science},
  year={2012},
  volume={21},
  pages={664 - 673}
}
Introduction: Newspaper reports advocating dietary intake changes may impact on dietary choice and food related health beliefs. The scientific basis and quality of evidence underpinning these reports is uncertain. Objective: To evaluate the scientific quality of newspaper reporting related to dietary advice. Design: Articles offering dietary advice from the top ten selling UK newspapers for a randomly selected week were assessed using two established evidence grading scales: developed by the… 

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