The psychotic spectrum: validity and reliability of the Structured Clinical Interview for the Psychotic Spectrum

@article{Sbrana2005ThePS,
  title={The psychotic spectrum: validity and reliability of the Structured Clinical Interview for the Psychotic Spectrum},
  author={Alfredo Sbrana and Liliana Dell’Osso and Antonella Benvenuti and Paola Rucci and Paolo Cassano and Susanna Banti and Chiara Gonnelli and Maria Rosa Doria and Laura Ravani and Sabrina Spagnolli and Luca Rossi and Federica Raimondi and Mario Catena and Jean Endicott and Ellen Frank and D. J. Kupfer and Giovanni Battista Cassano},
  journal={Schizophrenia Research},
  year={2005},
  volume={75},
  pages={375-387}
}

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The psychotic spectrum: development and theoretical foundations

Summary Background and aims Evidence from epidemiological studies indicates that bipolar disorder (BP) and schizo- phrenia (SCHI) have each a lifetime prevalence of 1% across the world's populations.