The psychological impact of a newly diagnosed seizure: losing and restoring perceived control.

Abstract

This study aimed to characterize the process of psychosocial adjustment following a newly diagnosed seizure. Eighty-five adult patients were assessed 1 and 3 months after a first seizure presentation with a purpose-developed semistructured interview, the NEWQOL, and the COPE. Among a broad range of patient concerns, psychological issues were paramount, representing a process of losing and restoring perceived control. Two psychological adjustment trajectories were identified, which hinged on the experience of a limited (n=37) or pervasive (n=48) loss of control. These adjustment trajectories were predicted by demographic and clinical factors. The pervasive group described a more extensive process of reevaluation, leading to an improved sense of self at 3 months. Pervasive loss of control, anxiety, and depression predicted subsequent seizure recurrence. Overall, a first seizure can trigger a complex adjustment process, which might require therapeutic management in some patients.

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@article{Velissaris2007ThePI, title={The psychological impact of a newly diagnosed seizure: losing and restoring perceived control.}, author={Sarah L Velissaris and Sarah J. Wilson and Michael M. Saling and Mark R. Newton and Samuel F. Berkovic}, journal={Epilepsy & behavior : E&B}, year={2007}, volume={10 2}, pages={223-33} }