The proprioceptive senses: their roles in signaling body shape, body position and movement, and muscle force.

@article{Proske2012ThePS,
  title={The proprioceptive senses: their roles in signaling body shape, body position and movement, and muscle force.},
  author={Uwe Proske and Simon C. Gandevia},
  journal={Physiological reviews},
  year={2012},
  volume={92 4},
  pages={
          1651-97
        }
}
This is a review of the proprioceptive senses generated as a result of our own actions. They include the senses of position and movement of our limbs and trunk, the sense of effort, the sense of force, and the sense of heaviness. Receptors involved in proprioception are located in skin, muscles, and joints. Information about limb position and movement is not generated by individual receptors, but by populations of afferents. Afferent signals generated during a movement are processed to code for… 
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