• Biology, Medicine
  • Published in The Biological bulletin 2004
  • DOI:10.2307/1543581

The projectile tooth of a fish-hunting cone snail: Conus catus injects venom into fish prey using a high-speed ballistic mechanism.

@article{Schulz2004ThePT,
  title={The projectile tooth of a fish-hunting cone snail: Conus catus injects venom into fish prey using a high-speed ballistic mechanism.},
  author={Joseph R. Schulz and Alex G Norton and William F. Gilly},
  journal={The Biological bulletin},
  year={2004},
  volume={207 2},
  pages={
          77-9
        }
}
Conus catus, a fish-hunting cone snail (Fig. 1A), delivers venom into its prey by means of a single-use radular tooth (Fig. 1B). The venom is composed of a potent mix of bioactive peptides that, when injected into a fish through the hollow harpoon-shaped tooth, causes tetanus of the body musculature, resulting in a rigid paralysis (1). Although peptide toxins in the venom have been extensively studied (2), the biomechanical mechanisms of tooth insertion and venom ejection have not been… CONTINUE READING

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