The production of "new" and "similar" phones in a foreign language: evidence for the effect of equivalence classification

@article{Flege1987ThePO,
  title={The production of "new" and "similar" phones in a foreign language: evidence for the effect of equivalence classification},
  author={J. Flege},
  journal={Journal of Phonetics},
  year={1987},
  volume={15},
  pages={47-65}
}
  • J. Flege
  • Published 1987
  • Mathematics, Political Science
  • Journal of Phonetics
Acoustic measurements were made of the voice onset time (VOT) and vowel formants (F1–F3) in French and English words spoken by native French subjects who were highly experienced in English, and by three groups of native English subjects differing according to French-language experience. The speech of monolingual subjects was also examined to estimate the phonetic norms of French and English. It was hypothesized that equivalence classification limits the extent to which L2 learners approximate… Expand

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