The problem of informed consent in emergency medicine research

@article{Fox2001ThePO,
  title={The problem of informed consent in emergency medicine research},
  author={Bernard A. Fo{\"e}x},
  journal={Emergency Medicine Journal},
  year={2001},
  volume={18},
  pages={198 - 204}
}
  • B. Foëx
  • Published 2001
  • Medicine
  • Emergency Medicine Journal
The CRASH Trial (Corticosteroid Randomisation After Significant Head injury), which started in April 1999 hopes to answer the question of whether or not there is any benefit to giving high dose corticosteroids after significant head injuries. To do this patients are randomised to receive either the standard care for head injuries, as defined by the receiving hospital, or standard care plus a 48 hour infusion of corticosteroids. This is to be started within eight hours of injury, preferably as… Expand
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TLDR
The CRASH trial has been designed as an early intervention when it is possible that the doctor will have a broad working diagnosis but may not have determined the final diagnosis, and the range of clinical scenarios to be included in the trial should be wide and that their exact description does not need to be known to the investigators. Expand
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Although the experiences confirmed the impracticality of attempting to obtain traditional prospective consent in clinical resuscitation research, deferred consent was found to be a reasonable solution. Expand
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It is argued that informed consent is chiefly a legalistic device to shift unpleasant physician responsibilities onto the patient and will result in fewer patients entering clinical trials because of negative attitudes induced by uncertainty of treatment and diminished confidence in the physician. Expand
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It is argued that journals should be free sometimes to publish research in which patients have not given fully informed consent and that a helpful approach would be to obtain “blanket” approval at the outset of treatment for inclusion in studies that might be in progress during the patient's illness. Expand
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