The problem Of muscle hypertrophy: Revisited

@article{Buckner2016ThePO,
  title={The problem Of muscle hypertrophy: Revisited},
  author={Samuel L. Buckner and Scott Justin Dankel and Kevin T Mattocks and Matthew B. Jessee and J Grant Mouser and Brittany R. Counts and Jeremy P. Loenneke},
  journal={Muscle \& Nerve},
  year={2016},
  volume={54}
}
In this paper we revisit a topic originally discussed in 1955, namely the lack of direct evidence that muscle hypertrophy from exercise plays an important role in increasing strength. To this day, long‐term adaptations in strength are thought to be primarily contingent on changes in muscle size. Given this assumption, there has been considerable attention placed on programs designed to allow for maximization of both muscle size and strength. However, the conclusion that a change in muscle size… 
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