The prevalence of voice-hearers in the general population: A literature review

@article{Beavan2011ThePO,
  title={The prevalence of voice-hearers in the general population: A literature review},
  author={Vanessa Beavan and John Read and Claire Cartwright},
  journal={Journal of Mental Health},
  year={2011},
  volume={20},
  pages={281 - 292}
}
Background. It is increasingly understood that voice-hearing is neither a rare phenomenon experienced only by ‘psychiatric patients’ nor a meaningless symptom of a ‘mental illness’. Aims. To estimate the prevalence of voice-hearing in the adult general population. Methods. PsycINFO and relevant literature reviews were searched for studies of the prevalence of verbal auditory hallucinations among adults. Results. Seventeen surveys, from nine countries, were identified. Comparisons across studies… Expand
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