The prevalence of seasonal affective disorder in the netherlands: a prospective and retrospective study of seasonal mood variation in the general population

@article{Mersch1999ThePO,
  title={The prevalence of seasonal affective disorder in the netherlands: a prospective and retrospective study of seasonal mood variation in the general population},
  author={P. Mersch and H. Middendorp and A. Bouhuys and D. Beersma and R. H. Hoofdakker},
  journal={Biological Psychiatry},
  year={1999},
  volume={45},
  pages={1013-1022}
}
BACKGROUND The aim of the present study was to assess the prevalence of seasonal affective disorder (SAD) in The Netherlands. METHODS The subjects (n = 5356), randomly selected from community registers, were given the Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire and the Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale over a period of 13 months. The response rate was 52.6%. RESULTS Three percent of the respondents met the criteria for winter SAD, 0.1% for summer SAD. The criteria for… Expand
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