The prevalence of low back pain: a systematic review of the literature from 1966 to 1998.

@article{Walker2000ThePO,
  title={The prevalence of low back pain: a systematic review of the literature from 1966 to 1998.},
  author={Bruce Walker},
  journal={Journal of spinal disorders},
  year={2000},
  volume={13 3},
  pages={
          205-17
        }
}
  • B. Walker
  • Published 1 June 2000
  • Medicine
  • Journal of spinal disorders
A systematic literature review of population prevalence studies of low back pain between 1966 and 1998 was conducted to investigate data homogeneity and appropriateness for pooling. Fifty-six studies were analyzed using methodologic criteria that examined sample representativeness, data quality, and pain definition. Acceptable studies were assessed for homogeneity and appropriateness for pooling. Thirty were methodologically acceptable. Of these there were significant differences in study… 
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References

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TLDR
A more stringent, systematic, and uniform methodologic approach to studying the prevalence (or incidence) of back pain is needed.
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TLDR
The estimated 1-month prevalence of low back pain in an adult population in the United Kingdom was between 35% and 37%.
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TLDR
The low consultation rate, time off, and day‐to‐day disability indicate that most episodes of low back pain are self‐limiting, and significant discrepancies between data sources suggest patient recall bias or underrecording in case notes.
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TLDR
Acute back pain is common and care is often sought regardless of income and insurance status, and gender, income, age, rural residence, and health insurance status did not correlate with the decision to seek medical care.
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TLDR
Prevalence estimates indicate that an emphasis on early intervention and primary care management of simple low back pain as recommended by the CSAG could generate a 131% surge in demand for physical therapy.
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TLDR
There was little variation in the estimates over age groups, but women experienced more high‐disability back pain than men, and there was no evidence of selective response bias by low back pain status in the survey.
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TLDR
Joint pain was the most prevalent site of pain reported, followed by night leg pain, back pain, and leg pain while walking, and there was a corresponding increase in impact on daily activities.
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TLDR
Substantial nonbiologic influences on the prevalence and treatment of LBP are demonstrated, and an agenda for health services researchers is suggested.
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TLDR
Geographical variation in rates of general practice consultation for low back pain in Britain is due largely to differences in patient behaviour once symptoms have developed and the distribution of important causes of low back back pain across the country is probably fairly uniform.
Reporting of Acute Low Back Pain in a Telephone Interview|Identification of Potential Biases
TLDR
Lack of recall occurs regarding acute low back pain, usually a self-limited illness, and a potential under-estimate of back pain prevalence may be balanced by forward telescoping of the date of illness occurrence.
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