The prebiological paleoatmosphere: Stability and composition

@article{Levine2004ThePP,
  title={The prebiological paleoatmosphere: Stability and composition},
  author={Joel S. Levine and Tommy R. Augustsson and Murali Natarajan},
  journal={Origins of life},
  year={2004},
  volume={12},
  pages={245-259}
}
In the past, it was generally assumed that the early atmosphere of the Earth contained appreciable quantities of methane (CH4) and ammonia (NH3). This was the type of atmosphere believed to be the most suitable environment for chemical evolution, the nonbiological formation of complex organic molecules, the precursors of living systems. Photochemical considerations suggest that a CH4−NH3 dominated early atmosphere was probably very short-lived, if it ever existed at all. Instead, an early… Expand

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