The practical, moral, and ethical considerations of the new Israeli law for the allocation of donor organs.

Abstract

There is a worldwide shortage of organs for transplantation; the number of patients on the waiting list exceeds the supply of available organs. The demand for organ donation is particularly concerning in Israel. A new Israeli law has been instituted to give those who sign donor cards allocation priority if they are ever in need of an organ transplant themselves. A number of variations on this paradigm that considers the willingness of patients to donate their own organs have since been proposed; however, the new Israeli policy for organ donation is the first time such a law has been implemented nationally. Prioritization of organ allocation to donors comes with a significant moral and ethical debate, and since its implementation in January 2010 there has been much controversy surrounding the new policy. This article provides a description of the new Israeli plan, specifically focusing on the practical, moral, and ethical debates surrounding the new system.

DOI: 10.1016/j.transproceed.2010.09.146

Cite this paper

@article{Gruenbaum2010ThePM, title={The practical, moral, and ethical considerations of the new Israeli law for the allocation of donor organs.}, author={Benjamin Fredrick Gruenbaum and Allen Jotkowitz}, journal={Transplantation proceedings}, year={2010}, volume={42 10}, pages={4475-8} }