The power of simulation: Imagining one's own and other's behavior

@article{Decety2006ThePO,
  title={The power of simulation: Imagining one's own and other's behavior},
  author={Jean Decety and Julie Gr{\`e}zes},
  journal={Brain Research},
  year={2006},
  volume={1079},
  pages={4-14}
}
Your body and mine: A neuropsychological perspective
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