The poverty of journal publishing

@article{Beverungen2012ThePO,
  title={The poverty of journal publishing},
  author={Armin Beverungen and Steffen B{\"o}hm and Christopher D. Land},
  journal={Organization},
  year={2012},
  volume={19},
  pages={929 - 938}
}
The article opens with a critical analysis of the dominant business model of for-profit, academic publishing, arguing that the extraordinarily high profits of the big publishers are dependent upon a double appropriation that exploits both academic labour and universities’ financial resources. Against this model, we outline four possible responses: the further development of open access repositories, a fair trade model of publishing regulation, a renaissance of the university presses, and… 

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