The potential role of the Arthus and Shwartzman reactions in the pathogenesis of pneumonic pasteurellosis

Abstract

Pneumonic pasteurellosis (PP) is an economically important disease in cattle, sheep, and goats. Pasteurella haemolytica is commonly isolated from the severe fibrinopurulent pneumonia that characterize this respiratory syndrome. During infection, the bacteria produce leukotoxin (LKT) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), both potent inducers of inflammation. Nonetheless, it has also been demonstrated that an exacerbated host's inflammatory response is responsible for the severe lung damage. Despite research in this field, the pathogenesis of PP is still incomplete. Two classical models of acute inflammatory response induced in laboratory animals, the Arthus and Shwartzman reactions, could explain the pathogenesis of the severe lung lesions that characterize PP.

DOI: 10.1007/s000110050565

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@article{RamrezRomero2000ThePR, title={The potential role of the Arthus and Shwartzman reactions in the pathogenesis of pneumonic pasteurellosis}, author={Rafael Ram{\'i}rez-Romero and Kim A. Brogden}, journal={Inflammation Research}, year={2000}, volume={49}, pages={98-101} }