The potential for floral mimicry in rewardless orchids: an experimental study.

@article{Gigord2002ThePF,
  title={The potential for floral mimicry in rewardless orchids: an experimental study.},
  author={Luc D. B. Gigord and Mark R. Macnair and Martin Stř{\'i}tesk{\'y} and Ann Smithson},
  journal={Proceedings. Biological sciences},
  year={2002},
  volume={269 1498},
  pages={1389-95}
}
More than one-third of orchid species do not provide their pollinators with either pollen or nectar rewards. Floral mimicry could explain the maintenance of these rewardless orchid species, but most rewardless orchids do not appear to have a rewarding plant that they mimic specifically. We tested the hypothesis that floral mimicry can occur through similarity based on corolla colour alone, using naive bumble-bees foraging on arrays of plants with one rewarding model species, and one rewardless… CONTINUE READING

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