The position of the retinal area centralis changes with age in Champsocephalus gunnari (Channichthyidae), a predatory fish from coastal Antarctic waters

@article{Miyazaki2011ThePO,
  title={The position of the retinal area centralis changes with age in Champsocephalus gunnari (Channichthyidae), a predatory fish from coastal Antarctic waters},
  author={Taeko Miyazaki and Tetsuo Iwami and Victor Benno Meyer-Rochow},
  journal={Polar Biology},
  year={2011},
  volume={34},
  pages={1117-1123}
}
Histological examinations of the topographical distribution and the area of highest density (the area centralis: AC) of presumed retinal ganglion cells found in the retina in 0- to 6-year-old Champsocephalus gunnari revealed differences between younger and older fish. Individuals of up to 2 years of age had the AC in the temporal retina, whereas in 3-, 4-, 5- and 6-year-old fish it was positioned in the ventro-temporal region of the retina. The main visual axis in the pitch plane of C. gunnari… Expand

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