The population history of northeastern Siberia since the Pleistocene

@article{Sikora2018ThePH,
  title={The population history of northeastern Siberia since the Pleistocene},
  author={Martin Sikora and Vladimir V. Pitulko and Vitor C. Sousa and Morten E. Allentoft and Lasse Vinner and Simon Rasmussen and Ashot Margaryan and Peter de Barros Damgaard and Constanza de la Fuente Castro and Gabriel Renaud and Melinda A. Yang and Qiaomei Fu and Isabelle Dupanloup and Konstantinos Giampoudakis and David Bravo Nogues and Carsten Rahbek and Guus J Kroonen and Micha{\"e}l Peyrot and Hugh McColl and Sergey V. Vasilyev and Elizaveta V. Veselovskaya and Margarita Gerasimova and Elena Yu Pavlova and Vyacheslav G. Chasnyk and Pavel A. Nikolskiy and Pavel S. Grebenyuk and Alexander Yu. Fedorchenko and Alexander I. Lebedintsev and Sergey B. Slobodin and Boris Malyarchuk and Rui Martiniano and Morten Meldgaard and Laura Arppe and Jukka Palo and Tarja Sundell and Kristiina Mannermaa and Mikko Putkonen and Verner Alexandersen and Charlotte Primeau and Ripan Mahli and Karl-G{\"o}ran Sj{\"o}gren and Kristian Kristiansen and Anna Wessman and Antti Sajantila and Marta Miraz{\'o}n Lahr and Richard Durbin and Rasmus Nielsen and David J. Meltzer and Laurent Excoffier and Eske Willerslev},
  journal={bioRxiv},
  year={2018}
}
Far northeastern Siberia has been occupied by humans for more than 40 thousand years. Yet, owing to a scarcity of early archaeological sites and human remains, its population history and relationship to ancient and modern populations across Eurasia and the Americas are poorly understood. Here, we analyze 34 ancient genome sequences, including two from fragmented milk teeth found at the ~31.6 thousand-year-old (kya) Yana RHS site, the earliest and northernmost Pleistocene human remains found… Expand
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