The polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein PGIP2 of Phaseolus vulgaris has evolved a mixed mode of inhibition of endopolygalacturonase PG1 of Botrytis cinerea.

@article{Sicilia2005ThePP,
  title={The polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein PGIP2 of Phaseolus vulgaris has evolved a mixed mode of inhibition of endopolygalacturonase PG1 of Botrytis cinerea.},
  author={Francesca Sicilia and Juan Fern{\'a}ndez-Recio and Claudio Caprari and Giulia De Lorenzo and Demetrius Tsernoglou and Felice Cervone and Luca Federici},
  journal={Plant physiology},
  year={2005},
  volume={139 3},
  pages={1380-8}
}
Botrytis cinerea is a phytopathogenic fungus that causes gray mold in >1,000 plant species. During infection, it secretes several endopolygalacturonases (PGs) to degrade cell wall pectin, and among them, BcPG1 is constitutively expressed and is an important virulence factor. To counteract the action of PGs, plants express polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) that have been shown to inhibit a variety of PGs with different inhibition kinetics, both competitive and noncompetitive. The PG… CONTINUE READING