The politics of gaydar: ideological differences in the use of gendered cues in categorizing sexual orientation.

@article{Stern2013ThePO,
  title={The politics of gaydar: ideological differences in the use of gendered cues in categorizing sexual orientation.},
  author={Chadly Stern and Tessa V. West and John T. Jost and Nicholas O. Rule},
  journal={Journal of personality and social psychology},
  year={2013},
  volume={104 3},
  pages={
          520-41
        }
}
In the present research, we investigated whether, because of differences in cognitive style, liberals and conservatives would differ in the process of categorizing individuals into a perceptually ambiguous group. In 3 studies, we examined whether conservatives were more likely than liberals to rely on gender inversion cues (e.g., feminine = gay) when categorizing male faces as gay vs. straight, and the accuracy implications of differential cue usage. In Study 1, perceivers made dichotomous… 

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