The politics of cancer

@article{Epstein2000ThePO,
  title={The politics of cancer},
  author={Epstein},
  journal={JAMA},
  year={2000},
  volume={284 4},
  pages={
          442
        }
}
  • Epstein
  • Published 2000
  • Political Science, Medicine
  • JAMA
Although cancer is not the leading cause of death (number two after arteria l diseases), nor the leading cause ofloss of"working" (i.e., before 65) years (number three after accidents and arterial diseases), it has become the leading disease concern of the U.S. public. It is increasing as a percentage of deaths, and its incidence is also increasing, so that by the year 2,000, it is estimated, I out of 4 of us will get it and I out of 5 of us will die from it. It is a disease that causes vast… Expand

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