• Corpus ID: 37928087

The place of viruses in biology in light of the metabolism- versus-replication-first debate.

@article{LpezGarca2012ThePO,
  title={The place of viruses in biology in light of the metabolism- versus-replication-first debate.},
  author={Purificaci{\'o}n L{\'o}pez‐Garc{\'i}a},
  journal={History and philosophy of the life sciences},
  year={2012},
  volume={34 3},
  pages={
          391-406
        }
}
The last decade has seen a revival of old virocentric ideas. These concepts are heterogeneous, extending from proposals that consider viruses functionally as living beings and/or as descendants of viral lineages that preceded cell evolution to other claims that consider viruses and/or some viral families a fourth domain of life. While the debates about whether viruses are alive or not and whether some virus-like replicators preceded the first cells fall under the long-lasting dichotomous view… 

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