The place of the Basques in the European Y-chromosome diversity landscape

@article{Alonso2005ThePO,
  title={The place of the Basques in the European Y-chromosome diversity landscape},
  author={Santos Alonso and Carlos Flores and Vicente M. Cabrera and Antonio Alonso and Pablo Mart{\'i}n and Cristina Albarr{\'a}n and Neskuts Izagirre and Concepci{\'o}n de la R{\'u}a and {\'O}scar Garc{\'i}a},
  journal={European Journal of Human Genetics},
  year={2005},
  volume={13},
  pages={1293-1302}
}
There is a trend to consider the gene pool of the Basques as a ‘living fossil’ of the earliest modern humans that colonized Europe. To investigate this assumption, we have typed 45 binary markers and five short tandem repeat loci of the Y chromosome in a set of 168 male Basques. Results on these combined haplotypes were analyzed in the context of matching data belonging to approximately 3000 individuals from over 20 European, Near East and North African populations, which were compiled from the… 
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TLDR
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