The place of premedication in pediatric practice

@article{Rosenbaum2009ThePO,
  title={The place of premedication in pediatric practice},
  author={Abraham Rosenbaum and Zeev N. Kain and Peter Larsson and Per‐Arne L{\"o}nnqvist and Andrew Wolf},
  journal={Pediatric Anesthesia},
  year={2009},
  volume={19}
}
Behind the multiple arguments for and against the use of premedication, sedative drugs in children is a noble principle that of minimizing psychological trauma related to anesthesia and surgery. However, several confounding factors make it very difficult to reach didactic evidence‐based conclusions. One of the key confounding issues is that the nature of expectations and responses for both parent and child vary greatly in different environments around the world. Studies applicable to one… 
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The aim of the present editorial is to put a number of the proposed benefits of this drug into a more balanced perspective.
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PPIA in addition to 0.5 mg/kg oral midazolam has no additive effects in terms of reducing a child’s anxiety and parents who accompanied their children to the operating room were less anxious and more satisfied.
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TLDR
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