The physiology of vocalization by the echolocating oilbird,Steatornis caripensis

@article{Suthers2004ThePO,
  title={The physiology of vocalization by the echolocating oilbird,Steatornis caripensis},
  author={R. Suthers and D. Hector},
  journal={Journal of Comparative Physiology A},
  year={2004},
  volume={156},
  pages={243-266}
}
Summary1.Oilbirds (Steatornis caripensis; Steatornithidae) have a bilaterally asymmetrical bronchial syrinx (Fig. 2) with which they produce echolocating clicks and a variety of social vocalizations. The sonar clicks typically have a duration of about 40 to 50 ms and can be classified as continuous, double or single. Agonistic squawks typically have a duration of about 0.5 s and contain multiple harmonic components (Figs. 5, 6).2.Both sonar clicks and agonistic squawks are initiated by… Expand
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