The physiology of cooperative breeding in a rare social canid; sex, suppression and pseudopregnancy in female Ethiopian wolves

@article{Kesteren2013ThePO,
  title={The physiology of cooperative breeding in a rare social canid; sex, suppression and pseudopregnancy in female Ethiopian wolves},
  author={Freya van Kesteren and Monique Christina Johanna Paris and David W. Macdonald and Robert Peter Millar and Kifle Argaw and Paul J. Johnson and Wenche Kristin Farstad and C. Sillero‐Zubiri},
  journal={Physiology \& Behavior},
  year={2013},
  volume={122},
  pages={39-45}
}
Ethiopian wolves, Canis simensis, differ from other cooperatively breeding canids in that they combine intense sociality with solitary foraging, making them a suitable species in which to study the physiology of cooperative breeding. The reproductive physiology of twenty wild female Ethiopian wolves (eleven dominant and nine subordinate) in Ethiopia's Bale Mountains National Park was studied non-invasively through the extraction and assaying of estradiol, progesterone and glucocorticoids in… 
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