The physiology and pathophysiology of human breath-hold diving.

@article{Lindholm2009ThePA,
  title={The physiology and pathophysiology of human breath-hold diving.},
  author={Peter Lindholm and Claes E. G. Lundgren},
  journal={Journal of applied physiology},
  year={2009},
  volume={106 1},
  pages={
          284-92
        }
}
This is a brief overview of physiological reactions, limitations, and pathophysiological mechanisms associated with human breath-hold diving. Breath-hold duration and ability to withstand compression at depth are the two main challenges that have been overcome to an amazing degree as evidenced by the current world records in breath-hold duration at 10:12 min and depth of 214 m. The quest for even further performance enhancements continues among competitive breath-hold divers, even if absolute… 

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