The physical, functional, and developmental outcome of pediatric burn survivors from 1 to 12 months postinjury.

Abstract

Fifty-one children with an average age of 27 months and who had sustained a burn injury were tested at 1, 6, and 12 months postinjury to determine their physical, functional, and developmental outcomes. Most parents were either African-American or Hispanic, lived on public assistance, and had a high school education or less. Most children had normal range of motion and were appropriate for their age in self-care skills. On the basis of the Home Screening Questionnaire, 48% of the children came from suspect home environments. Developmental delays were noted in language acquisition that persisted over the first year postburn. Although the outcomes of these burn injuries were good in physical and functional areas, the developmental findings raised concerns. The results alert clinicians to screen for potential developmental problems during the burned child's recovery phase and to include appropriate developmental activities and parental guidance in the treatment plan.

Cite this paper

@article{Gorga1999ThePF, title={The physical, functional, and developmental outcome of pediatric burn survivors from 1 to 12 months postinjury.}, author={Delia I Gorga and Joseph R. Johnson and Abigail Bentley and Robert A Silverberg and Matthew E. Glassman and Michael Madden and Roger Yurt and Willibald Nagler}, journal={The Journal of burn care & rehabilitation}, year={1999}, volume={20 2}, pages={171-8; discussion 170} }