The physical and social determinants of mortality in the 3.11 tsunami.

@article{Aldrich2015ThePA,
  title={The physical and social determinants of mortality in the 3.11 tsunami.},
  author={Daniel P. Aldrich and Yasuyuki Sawada},
  journal={Social science \& medicine},
  year={2015},
  volume={124},
  pages={
          66-75
        }
}
The human consequences of the 3.11 tsunami were not distributed equally across the municipalities of the Tohoku region of northeastern Japan. Instead, the mortality rate from the massive waves varied tremendously from zero to ten percent of the local residential population. What accounts for this variation remains a critical question for researchers and policy makers alike. This paper uses a new, sui generis data set including all villages, towns, and cities on the Pacific Ocean side of the… Expand
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