The phylogeography of Y chromosome binary haplotypes and the origins of modern human populations

@article{Underhill2001ThePO,
  title={The phylogeography of Y chromosome binary haplotypes and the origins of modern human populations},
  author={Peter A. Underhill and Giuseppe Passarino and Alice A. Lin and Peidong Shen and Marta Miraz{\'o}n Lahr and Robert A. Foley and Peter J. Oefner and Luca L. Cavalli-Sforza},
  journal={Annals of Human Genetics},
  year={2001},
  volume={65}
}
Although molecular genetic evidence continues to accumulate that is consistent with a recent common African ancestry of modern humans, its ability to illuminate regional histories remains incomplete. A set of unique event polymorphisms associated with the non‐recombining portion of the Y‐chromosome (NRY) addresses this issue by providing evidence concerning successful migrations originating from Africa, which can be interpreted as subsequent colonizations, differentiations and migrations… 

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