The phylogenetic status of Homo heidelbergensis – a cladistic study of Middle Pleistocene hominins

@article{Mounier2015ThePS,
  title={The phylogenetic status of Homo heidelbergensis – a cladistic study of Middle Pleistocene hominins},
  author={Aur{\'e}lie Mounier and Miguel Caparr{\'o}s},
  journal={BMSAP},
  year={2015},
  volume={27},
  pages={110-134}
}
Two views prevail concerning the significance of H. heidelbergensis in Middle Pleistocene human evolution. H. heidelbergensis sensu stricto refers to a European chronospecies of H. neanderthalensis while H. heidelbergensis sensu lato is considered to be an Afro-European species ancestral to modern humans and Neandertals.Here, we test the phylogenetic validity of H. heidelbergensis using a cladistic analysis based on cranial morphological data of Pleistocene fossils. We perform a low-level… Expand

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