The phylogenetic roots of human lethal violence

@article{Gmez2016ThePR,
  title={The phylogenetic roots of human lethal violence},
  author={Jos{\'e} Mar{\'i}a G{\'o}mez and Miguel Verd{\'u} and Adela Gonz{\'a}lez-Meg{\'i}as and Marco M{\'e}ndez},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2016},
  volume={538},
  pages={233-237}
}
The psychological, sociological and evolutionary roots of conspecific violence in humans are still debated, despite attracting the attention of intellectuals for over two millennia. Here we propose a conceptual approach towards understanding these roots based on the assumption that aggression in mammals, including humans, has a significant phylogenetic component. By compiling sources of mortality from a comprehensive sample of mammals, we assessed the percentage of deaths due to conspecifics… Expand
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