The phylogenetic distribution of electroreception: Evidence for convergent evolution of a primitive vertebrate sense modality

@article{Bullock1983ThePD,
  title={The phylogenetic distribution of electroreception: Evidence for convergent evolution of a primitive vertebrate sense modality},
  author={Theodore Holmes Bullock and David Bodznick and R. Glenn Northcutt},
  journal={Brain Research Reviews},
  year={1983},
  volume={6},
  pages={25-46}
}
Specializations for electroreception in sense organs and brain centers are found in a wide variety of fishes and amphibians, though probably in a small minority of teleost taxa. No other group of vertebrates or invertebrates is presently suspected to have adaptations for electroreception in the definition given here. The distribution among fishes is unlike any other sense modality in that it has apparently been invented, lost completely and reinvented several times independently, using distinct… 
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