The perceived benefits of singing: findings from preliminary surveys of a university college choral society.

@article{Clift2001ThePB,
  title={The perceived benefits of singing: findings from preliminary surveys of a university college choral society.},
  author={Stephen M. Clift and Grenville Hancox},
  journal={The journal of the Royal Society for the Promotion of Health},
  year={2001},
  volume={121 4},
  pages={
          248-56
        }
}
Two exploratory studies are reported on the perceived benefits associated with active participation in choral singing. In the first study, 84 members of a university college choral society completed a brief questionnaire that asked whether they had benefited personally from their involvement in the choir and whether there were ways in which participation could benefit their health. A large majority of respondents agreed they had benefited socially (87%) and emotionally (75%), with 58% agreeing… CONTINUE READING

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